Make Your Age an Asset! Job Search Tips If You’re Over 50

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Make Your Age an Asset! Job Search Tips If You’re Over 50

Many mature workers worry that their age will work against them in a job search, well great news!  I have a solution for you:  Make your age an asset!

A person’s years of experience can be a huge asset to future employers.  Some new job data suggests that older workers are actually in demand.  A recent Challenger, Gray & Christmas study shows that of the 4.3 million jobs created in the past three years, nearly 3 million have gone to people over the age of 55.

baby-boomers

Older workers can improve their success rate by focusing on the value of their experience.  Here are steps you can take to make age an asset.

1. Network across all platforms. Harness the power of your personal, community, and business network. Mature workers have the advantage of a developed network, both online–for example, through LinkedIn–and offline. Think about your connections and who can potentially refer you for an open position. If your application is marked as a referral, it triples your chances of securing an interview.
Don’t procrastinate when you find out about job openings. StartWire research shows that 50% of successful new hires applied within the first week of a job being posted; 75% applied in the first three weeks. If you find out about a job opening from a contact, send in your application immediately and have the contact mark it as a referral. (See “How to Grow Your Network Without Really Trying.”)

2. Focus on relevant, recent experience. There is no need to list on your resume every position you have held since you entered the workforce. That will put the spotlight on your age, rather than your talent. Instead, focus on work experience that shows you have the skills needed for the job you are targeting. If you can’t make that connection, in your description of a past position, consider downplaying or removing it from your resume.

3. Find employers who will value your know-how. Many employers seek out older workers. Far from being a blemish, your age will put your resume on top of the pile. Financial services firms, for example, have a primarily older client base. To best reflect their clientele, they often prefer older employees.

Other companies, constrained by the current economy, do not have the time or resources to extensively train new hires. They want to bring someone in who can sit down and produce work on day one. This is a growing trend across multiple industries. And don’t overlook startups and non-profits.

4. Don’t ignore glaring resume gaps. While you shouldn’t list every experience held, try to fill in recent resume gaps when possible. Employers will wonder what you were doing, and in the absence of information could assume the worst. If you were forced to take time off to care for a loved one, it is okay to put “caregiver” in place of a gap. If you’ve filled time with volunteer work, include that detail. It’s a bonus if you’ve honed skills while volunteering, so feel free to mention it very briefly.

5. Stay in the loop. Keep up with trends in your industry. Follow blogs, join relevant groups on LinkedIn, and participate in the discussion. Look for a local networking group for people in your profession, or start one if it doesn’t exist. Joining a group like this or a job club or meetup group for job seekers can help you stay on top of trends. The more people you meet and reach out to, the more you will learn and the more likely you are to find job opportunities.

6. Upgrade your skills strategically. Depending on your field, you may need to advance your skills to be competitive. This is especially true with new technology. Find out what programs potential employers value, and take a class or a refresher course in your community or online. If you’re not already active in social media, develop a digital footprint.

7. Practice interviewing. If you haven’t recently participated in interviews, brush up on your skills. Do a practice round with a friend. Focus on the skill set that you can bring to the company. Have a few questions of your own ready–for example, about the company’s plans for the future.

 

Try to stay away from personal topics. A friendly interviewer and your own nervousness may lead you to let your guard down and reveal personal details that work against you, like health problems and family woes. It’s often in these moments that employers make a decision on your cultural fit for the organization. So show off your best self.

I specialize in helping job applicants create the resume that will get them noticed by the right people and provide them with confidence in getting the career and dream job they desire. Please contact me today so I can help you create the best resume and cover letter today and put your best foot forward!

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